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  #11  
Old 09-16-2012, 12:53 PM
Samcrawford Samcrawford is offline
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The show is just about to start! We're having a Downton party with big hats to celebrate. Can't wait!!
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  #12  
Old 09-16-2012, 01:05 PM
sisterlura sisterlura is offline
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can't wait can't wait can't wait can't wait!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Love the party idea, samcrawford!!

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  #13  
Old 09-16-2012, 03:06 PM
Samcrawford Samcrawford is offline
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Well, that was wonderful!! I absolutely love the character of Martha and she's so different to what I expected. It's a great dynamic to have this breath of fresh air blowing through Downton. I won't say anymore because I may give things away for people but a wonderful first episode, a wonderful performance from Shirley and we can't wait for the next one!

P.S - the guests gasped in unison at Shirley's entrance!
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  #14  
Old 09-16-2012, 04:57 PM
PAULA CAMPOS PAULA CAMPOS is offline
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AWESOME!

Loved every single second of it!!!!!!!!!!!

Maggie Smith and Shirley MacLaine are going to be brilliant together
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  #15  
Old 09-16-2012, 05:56 PM
ShelleyD ShelleyD is offline
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Love it...how very exciting! I will have to be patient and wait until January.

RobKendall...Beautiful photos~Thanks for sharing!!!! Shirley has such great personal power and charisma!

Samcrawford....fun idea about a party!
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  #16  
Old 09-16-2012, 05:56 PM
Robin33 Robin33 is offline
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I know I can not wait to see this.. Shirley and Maggie I am sure are brilliant together. Times like this, I wish I was in London so I could be seeing this now and not waiting till January.
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  #17  
Old 09-16-2012, 06:45 PM
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Default [Her] much-anticipated entrance ... was a masterclass in how to command an audience.

From www.Telegraph.co.uk

Ben Lawrence reviews the first episode of ITV1's Downton Abbey, series 3.

Downton Abbey, ITV1, review

By Ben Lawrence10:45PM BST 16 Sep 2012

At the end of last year’s Downton Abbey Christmas special, Dan Stevens’s Matthew Crawley got down on bended knee and proposed to Lady Mary (Michelle Dockery). There was a picturesque flurry of snow, Christmas lights twinkled, and, if I’m not mistaken, angels descended from the skies and sang madrigals. It was a deeply satisfying episode for fans who had become anxious after the wonky, half-cooked storylines of series two.

But romance couldn’t be the answer indefinitely, could it? Julian Fellowes, the writer, knows that while we love a happy ending, there’s nothing like a bit of jeopardy to keep us watching. So, in a canny reflection of our straitened times, series three of the nation’s best-loved costume drama began with the revelation that the Crawleys had lost nearly all of their fortune, thanks to an ill-judged investment in the Canadian railways.

In fact, so keen was Fellowes to ensure that Downton Abbey had contemporary relevance that he also had Hugh Bonneville’s Earl of Grantham utter the words: “I don’t want to be the earl who dropped the torch and let the flame go out.” For one agonising moment, it looked as if Bonneville was going to break the fourth wall and give a knowing wink to the camera. Especially since Bonneville was also the star of the BBC’s spoof Olympics comedy, Twenty Twelve.

This felt like a programme back to its best, the one we fell in love with back in 2010. The script was tight; the detail was there.Fellowes’s gift then and now has been to assemble a large and varied cast of characters and make them interrelate in a plausible fashion, which is where the BBC rival Upstairs Downstairs — with its pared-down household, all of whom stared at one another as if they were strangers — so obviously failed.

And then there was the addition of Hollywood glamour. Shirley MacLaine’s much-anticipated entrance as Cora’s mother, Martha, was a masterclass in how to command an audience.

As she swished grandly out of her automobile onto the Downton drive, the cast looked quite terrified of her; maybe they were acting (Martha was pretty scary), or maybe they were simply in awe of MacLaine’s formidable reputation. Anyhow, Martha was a breath of fresh Transatlantic air; and humorously shrewd about the ways of the English.

“It’s so strange to think of the English embracing change,” she said, moments after her arrival. Maggie Smith’s Dowager Countess looked as though she had just been offered a mug of luke-warm Bovril.

But, ultimately, tensions are forgiven and forgotten at Downton. Halfway through last night’s episode, Mary nearly called off the wedding — “How can you be so disappointing, Matthew?” — but by the end, she was at the altar, and the whole house, both upstairs and downstairs, breathed a sigh of relief.

As she stood beside Matthew, Mary promised him she would be “unpredictable” — in a good way. It was a rather sweet moment but hard to imagine: for one of Downton’s most lovable qualities is that it is predictable. Good will conquer evil, love will conquer hate, and the Dowager Countess will conquer her distaste for vulgar Americans. Well, maybe.
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  #18  
Old 09-16-2012, 07:02 PM
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Default Shirley MacLaine in Downton Abbey, interview

Also from www.Telegraph.co.uk

Shirley MacLaine stars in Downton Abbey, and she is trying to get the English to share their emotions, she tells Benji Wilson

By Benji Wilson 7:00AM BST 14 Sep 2012

Shirley MacLaine is coming to Downton Abbey. She plays Martha Levinson, widowed American heiress and mother of Cora Crawley, Countess of Grantham. And, while it would be pleasing to imagine that she signed up because she adores the series, or the costumes, or the British theatrical tradition, the reality is a little more personal.

“I had a crush on Bates [the Earl of Grantham’s brooding valet]. And Julian Fellowes being as canny a person as one can be, he arranged a lunch for a bunch of us at which Brendan [Coyle, who plays Bates] was there. I don’t know if Julian thought maybe Cora’s mother would take up with a younger man – I don’t know what he thought. But I would not have said no.”

That is MacLaine all over – bawdy, brash, husky, incorrigible. At times she flirts. At times she chides (“Well that’s a little clee-shayed, Benji,” comes out like the sort of admonishment she might offer her beloved dog). At other times she veers off in to New Age gobbledegook about past lives and lost civilisations. Yet she is never, ever boring. Some say Downton needed a breath of fresh air. What it has got is a pair of bellows.

At 78 MacLaine remains as prolific as when she was churning out classics such as Some Came Running (1958) with Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin or timeless Billy Wilder comedies such as The Apartment (1960) with Jack Lemmon.

Her best actress Oscar for Terms of Endearment in 1983, after many nominations, seemed to crown a career that had taken in dance, musicals, high comedy and great drama, both real and fictional. Yet she has never stopped. I talk to her in Los Angeles but she has just come from New York, filming with Ben Stiller, and is on her way home to Santa Fe.

“I live in too many cities. I just finished a movie and I had to pack everything up in New York and put it in a suitcase and send it to Santa Fe, where I live. Now I’m in LA, and I need some of the things I sent to Santa Fe…”

In Downton, MacLaine’s heiress is from the days when American women who had money were looking for titles, and British titled men were looking for American money. This is the same pact that Martha’s daughter has made with Robert, Earl of Grantham (Hugh Bonneville). Wearing head-dresses and lavish jewellery, in a performance that is always only a nudge and a wink away from parody, Martha arrives as a resplendent New World counterpoint to Maggie Smith’s stuffy Dowager Countess.

“Martha’s basic role in these episodes is to plead with the Dowager Countess to wrest herself, if possible, away from tradition,” says MacLaine. “Because that’s what caused the war in the first place. And [for the Countess] to become more flexible in relating to change.”

Yet the Dowager Countess is not a lady renowned for her flexibility. As a result, MacLaine’s arrival has already been heralded as the matchup of the matriarchs. She plays down the possibility of fireworks.

“Martha is extremely outspoken but the Gunfight at the O K Corral does not happen between Maggie and me. We had our moments but it’s more sophisticated than that.”

The real life meetings on set between Smith and MacLaine sound every bit as intriguing as their scripted encounters.

“I’ve known Maggie for 40 years. She told me about the night we met at an awards ceremony. I was either a presenter or a host, and I was also up for something. Whatever I was up for, I lost. We were standing at the catering table back stage and there was a huge chocolate cake on the table. She said I tucked right in, saying, ‘Oh ---- it, now I can get fat.’ She remembered that!”

Most of their time working together was spent in a church, filming the wedding of the Earl’s oldest daughter, Lady Mary, to the dashing Matthew Crawley.

“She and I were sitting in a pew. Neither one of us likes to get up and sit down over and over because we’re old ladies. So we sat there together for about six hours just reminiscing about life and health and politics and showbusiness. It was so fabulous to be with such a great person for six hours straight.”

The story from the Downton set is that when Martha first arrived, and Shirley MacLaine first stepped out of her limo on the gravel, the director had to tell Laura Carmichael, Michelle Dockery and Jessica Brown Findlay to stop gawping and concentrate. MacLaine loves a good anecdote like nothing else so I pass this one on.

“I don’t know why anybody would be in awe of me. I am aware of who I am, but I was wondering why they were all so closed-mouthed. They were all so polite! I wanted them to say what they were feeling inside – but what a silly thing to expect – they’re English!”

She is fond of the Downton cast, praising in particular their self-effacement. “Remember, I come from such an excessively overdone, red-carpet place called Hollywood. So I’m used to people blowing up their success in ways that are far above and beyond the truth.

"What got me the most was the day I realised, when we were shooting outside the castle and it was wet and it was cold, that these extraordinary actors they just did their work; they didn’t relate to being famous all over the world.”

In any case, if they did want a bit of old Hollywood glamour they only had to ask. MacLaine has written 13 books of memoirs: she is an anecdote tombola.

“Every now and then they [the cast] would ask me about the Rat Pack or about Billy Wilder or about one of my prime-minister lovers. [In the Seventies MacLaine had an affair with the then Swedish prime minister, Olof Palme; she was also lovers with former Canadian prime minister Pierre Trudeau.] We were sitting around that damned dinner table for two weeks. There was a whole lot of ‘I’ve got your attention’ time. They did well for stories.”

She becomes most animated when we talk about the time she spent at Highclere Castle, where Downton was filmed, earlier this year.

Ever since her extraordinary 1970 memoir Don’t Fall off the Mountain, she has been renowned for views that vary from the esoteric to the downright batty: she claims in that book, for example, that she slept with Charlemagne when she was a Moorish peasant girl in a past life. Kooky or cuckoo, it all meant that Highclere, where a replica of King Tutankhamen’s tomb is a permanent exhibit, was “right up my alley”.

“We were shooting in a house that everybody said was haunted. They said pictures fell of the wall if any arguments ensued with the cast and of course King Tut’s tomb was in the basement. I’m glad it wasn’t the real thing or they wouldn’t have gotten me upstairs to work! I’d have been down there having a past-life experience with Tut. So I enjoyed that castle very much. Now that’s a once-in-a-lifetime experience: to shoot in such a hallowed place.”

So why make it just once in a lifetime: surely, with all of the hullabaloo that has accompanied her entrance, she must come back for Downton’s fourth series next year?

“Really it depends on my doggy – she’s 13 and I don’t want to be away from her for more than two weeks. But of course I would go back.”

I tell her that I am sure the producers of Downton Abbey would be more than happy to fly her dog over for as long as required.

“Are we talking about a private plane here? I would love to do it. But my personal life means a great deal to me, probably more now than ever. Because I don’t have to work. I just love the people there… Let’s not put the cart before the horse as they say. Let’s make it a surprise.”
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  #19  
Old 09-16-2012, 07:15 PM
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Default And yes, another clip -- about what is was like for the cast to work with Shirley

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  #20  
Old 09-17-2012, 07:00 AM
sisterlura sisterlura is offline
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Oh, I LOVE it, thanks soooo much, RobKendall, for the pics and articles! "Swished grandly out of the automobile..." I shall carry that image with me today ~~ it's a great alternate reality to fantasize over during my ho-hum drum-ness Monday ordinariness!

SM rocks!!

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